Plants: image 1 0f 4 thumb
Plants: image 1 0f 4 thumb
Plants: image 1 0f 4 thumb
Plants: image 1 0f 4 thumb
Plants: image 1 0f 4 thumb
Plants: image 1 0f 4 thumb
Plants: image 1 0f 4 thumb
Plants: image 1 0f 4 thumb
Plants: image 1 0f 4 thumb
Plants: image 1 0f 4 thumb
Plants: image 1 0f 4 thumb
Plants: image 1 0f 4 thumb
Seward Park House

Location: Seattle, WA
Services: Architecture and Interior Design
Contractor: CORVID General Contractors
The Maisano/Culberg family came to McNelis Architects with the unique challenge of reinventing a distinctive but dated Seward Park home built in 1961 for David Lew Wing. The new owners were in possession of the original plans drawn by architect Robert W. Beatty who passed away in 2000. There is ample information about him as this excerpt from his obit shows:“Architect Robert Wade Beatty was born in Portland, Oregon on November 30, 1927. He received his formal architectural training at the University of Washington graduating in 1956. Beatty became the Program Chair for the Seattle Times Home of the Month program in 1956.. ...Beatty worked with the Home Improvement Contractors Council of Home Builders Association to show the possibilities of remodeling an older home. Their “Project Face-lift” was featured in the Seattle Times (Dec. 1958). His design for the David Wing House (1961) near Seward Park with his associate, John Pearce Jones, was also featured in the Seattle Time (Apr. 1961).”We immediately appreciated the reasons this family with an active lifestyle and an extensive collection of eclectic artistic objects and paintings was drawn to this house with its dramatic ski chalet like spaces and early Space Needle aesthetic. Other aspects were dated and tired. Materials were of their time and we selectively celebrated some, like the fir slat ceilings and “60’s granite” fireplace while updating others: new custom finished birch ply floor replaced wall to wall carpeting for example. Single pane stopped-in glass screens were changed to fir windows with sandblasted insulated glass. One of the design challenges was how to deal with the extensive lighting soffits that were an important part of the original design but that the owners didn’t like as they also served to cut off views and darken the spaces. When faced with these decisions our overall guiding design principle was “respect but rethink”. Spacial changes included bringing the cave like kitchen into the public realm of the house, opening up spaces to the views of Lake Washington and the outdoors and reconfiguring exterior decks and windows. One of the most dramatic changes was to replace the cedar shingle roof with metal standing seam. It is our hope that through creative and sympathetic design that this home will reclaim its place as a remarkable architectural home long into the future.